My Pecha Kucha Presentation

28 Nov

THESE ARE MY PRESENTATION SLIDES ALONG WITH MY NOTES

 

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1. Hi my name is Joe Winfield and today I’m delivering my presentation called Grand Theft ASBO – Do Violent Video Games contribute to Anti Social behaviour in our children in this Modern Age? That’s the question that I’m arising today. Firstly I’m going to start off with a quote:

 

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2. From Doctor Bruce Bartholow, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Missouri about the effects of video games – “A single exposure to a violent video game won’t turn someone into a mass murderer, but, if someone has repeatedly exposed themselves, these kinds of effects in the short term can turn into long-term changes.”

 

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3. So, back to the question here, do violent video games contribute to anti social behavior in children? They do and they don’t. Obviously it is not 100% true, it does for some kids, not all. It impossible to disagree that it does to some level as studies show – 2/3s of kids play violent video games…

 

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4. …in todays society. Nearly every kid have been exposed to violent video games from a very young age. It’s very likely that they can walk into any shop and buy a violent video game, such as these two kids here who’re no older than 10years old purchasing call of duty.

 

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5. These games have been proven to cause aggression and anti social behaviour amongst kids. We’ve all seen on the news about violent youths committing crime, some minor and some very serious affecting a lot of people. How have they resulted in doing this?

 

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6.  Many Factors that contribute to AS behaviour include: Mental Health, Physical Health, Attention span, Anxiety, Aggression, Social Class, Upbringing, Etc.

 

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7. Also, factors like: Access to guns, cars, weapons etc – Allowing you to mimic the game characters at ease and obviously playing the games themselves.

 

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8. Playing video games is active. You become the aggressor. You enter Fright/flight/fight mode when gaming. Identifying with the game killer in these murder simulators and overtime, you become immune to what you’re doing. Killing people becomes fun, not morally incorrect or horrifying.

 

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9. When you get better at killing people in gaming you get rewards. Reward systems are built into most violent video games encouraging you to kill more and more innocent people, Often hearing audio cues like – great shot! MURDER STREAK! Instant killer!

 

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10. You can get so caught up in gaming that it can almost become so real with todays graphic and realistic scenarios. In games you can shoot people and rob cars. What’s stopping you doing that in real life? Obviously the law, but it’s easy to disregard it and do as you please.

 

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11. Different games cause different effects. For example with: GTA – Car theft, robbery, drugs, sex, violence, mass murder and Call of Duty – shooting people without end. The list is endless. So many games display different types of violence

 

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12. But of course there are positives to violent video games! What would this discussion be without a plus side? Video games has been proven to be good for you: Release your anger, Improve hand/eye coordination.. But that’s one or two positives in a pool of negatives.

 

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13. One person who knows all about the negatives is the anti gaming activist – Jack Thompson. His basic argument is that violent video games have repeatedly been used by children as “murder simulators”. To rehearse violent plans. He also quotes that “In every school shooting, we find that kids who pull the trigger are video gamers. These violent video games are physical appliances that teach kids how to kill and enjoy it”

 

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14. The events that I’m about to discuss are real life events that were inspired by violent video games. All the culprits in the forthcoming examples have stated that this is true. They conducted evil acts of violence that were caused by excessive video gaming.

 

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15. Firstly, the Columbine Shootings of 1999 in Columbine, Colorado that were carried out by two students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold. They injured 24 with homemade bombs and guns and also killed 13 and ultimately committing suicide.

 

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16. Why? They were labeled as outcasts by fellow students. They hated their school for treating them differently. They were also hardcore DOOM fans amongst various other first person shooter games. They also had an easy access to weaponry. They took out their anger on the people they hated most by replicating video game violence upon them.

 

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17.  Also, the likes of Devin Moore in 2005 who was an avid Grand Theft Auto fan, who ironically was caught committing Grand Theft Auto and ultimately killed three policemen in the process. In court he was given the death sentence. His last words were “Life’s a video game, you gotta die sometime”.

 

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18. Also, similarly, Joshua and William Buckner in 2003 who committed two accounts of murder, shooting two innocent drivers on interstate 40, Tennessee. They were sentenced to indefinite detention Why? – GTA 3 inspired them. Interesting enough, they claim it wasn’t supposed to happen but that gaming took over.

 

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19. And yet another, 13yr old Noah Wilson in 1997 who repetitively stabbed his best friend in the chest after playing mortal kombat. His mother caught him in the act saying that Noah was mimicking the actions of his character on screen performing his finishing move.

 

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20. Here’s an interesting – fact from these examples Jack Thompson has supported the families of the victims in all of the cases. He believes so strongly that violent video games are evil that he takes role of defence lawyer in any such case as possible very seriously.

 

 

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21. And from these examples we also see that these culprits are all American. Most of the well known incidents in relation to video game violence involve americans. They are the most effected. But obviously it happens elsewhere just at a lesser. One big example from Europe is the man behind the Norway Attacks of 2011.

 

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22. Anders Breivik – Who Bombed government buildings in Oslo, killing eight. And he then killed 69 people in a mass shooting at an AUF camp on the island of Utoya. He was convicted of mass murder for 25years. He said in court that he trained for this event playing Call of Duty endlessly – Saying it was so easy to learn, his grandmother could’ve done it too.

 

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23. Also Tristan van der vils in 2011. Who killed six people and wounded 17 with a rifle in a shopping centre in the Netherlands,  and then killed himself. He was known as an avid Call of Duty fan just like Breivik and also suffered from Paranoid Schizophrenia which could’ve made him believe he was a part of the game.

 

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24. So many examples of video game inspired crime. So many deaths on screen now being displayed in real life. So many robberies and theft inspired by games like Grand Theft Auto. Things like this is why I strongly believe that video games do trigger select people to do such evil things.

 

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25. But, Is it that easy to just blame video games? Could it all lead to something like bad parenting? Or perhaps their social upbringing? Is it just video games?

 

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26. No, it’s not just video games that inspire such acts of criminality but they are a strong influence on how some kids behave in this modern age. Violent games are so easy to pick up and play it’s easy to see why sometimes they are the blame. Jack Thompson calling these games murder simulators I believe is very true indeed.

 

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27. So, to conclude, Do Video Games contribute to Anti Social behaviour in our children in this Modern Age? Violent ones do in some ways, but obviously not in every game and child, but a small percentage of those and that small percentage have caused a lot of damage to date.

 

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28. And that wraps up my Grand Theft ASBO presentation. Thank you for listening. I’ve been Joe Winfield. Any Questions?

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